Triple Time for England!

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In case you missed the statistical highlight from the fifth Test in Chennai, it was, drumroll please… Moeen Ali’s 1-190 from 41 overs.

Only joking! It was Karun Nair’s 303 not out. Nair had been run out for four on Test debut earlier in the series and made 13 in his second outing. Had it not been for injuries he may not have even played this match. As it turned out he struck a maiden Test century and duly converted to into a triple… as you do!

England’s last Test triple century was Graham Gooch’s 333 way back in 1990. Since then Australia, India, Pakistan, South Africa, Sri Lanka and West Indies have all had at least two Test triple centurions and New Zealand have had one. Only Bangladesh, Zimbabwe and England have not had an individual reach 300 in the last twenty-six years!

Whilst England may not have scored any Test triple centuries in the last twenty-six years, I’ll let Silly Point’s loyal following hazard a guess as to which nation have been the victim of the most triple tons in that time…

… yes you’ve guessed it, it’s England themselves. First Brian Lara, then Lara again followed by Hashim Amla and now Nair. Clearly England need fear any batsman with a surname consisting of only four letters!

Surely that means that Alastair Cook, Joe Root and… Adam Lyth are fabricated for Test triple tons. Cook came close with 294 against India, made 263 against Pakistan and 235 not out against Australia. Root made 254 against Pakistan having previously made 200 not out against Sri Lanka. Lyth had made 107 against New Zealand and looked destined for a Test triple ton but went and got himself run out!

England will likely have a long wait, if twenty-six years wasn’t already long enough, for another Test triple because their next Test isn’t until July, unless of course somebody strokes 300 in a day tomorrow!

International Duck Watch!

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Welcome to Test cricket Nic Maddinson! One of three Australian debutantes Maddinson lasted twelve deliveries before falling victim to South Africa’s Kagiso Rabada in the third Test at Adelaide. For the record the home side’s other debutantes, Middlesbrough born opening batsman Matthew Renshaw and former Gloucestershire middle-order player Peter Handscomb faired little and much better, registering scores of 10 and 54 respectively. Let’s not forget that successful Test players such as Graham Gooch, Phillip Hughes and Marvan Atapattu all registered ducks on their Test bows so all is not yet lost for Maddinson though the state of the game could leave the twenty-four-year-old without a second innings opportunity.

In Hamilton New Zealand opening batsman Tom Latham fell first ball to Mohammad Amir in his side’s second Test against Pakistan. Latham made scores of 1 and 9 in the first Test so is currently averaging a mighty 3.33 in the series! New Zealand were 77-2 in their first innings when rain curtailed play.

Finally, in a crucial Tri-Series match in Zimbabwe the home team’s Sean Williams fell first ball to Ashley Nurse, caught by our man Shai Hope. As a result Williams will need nursing better! West Indies had their own goldie in the form of Johnson Charles. Charles was caught and bowled by Zimbabwe hero Tendai Chisoro. Chisoro scored 42 not out off 35 deliveries batting at number ten, putting on an unbroken stand of 91 with Sikander Raza before recording figures of 6-1-23-2 as Zimbabwe claimed a spot in the final.