It’s a Blogging World

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It’s been over a year now since I commenced writing this blog and like the world of cricket the globe has been constantly evolving.

It’s hardly surprising that the United Kingdom provides my most hits but that the USA comes second is interesting. Is there a growing interest in cricket in America or just a strong expatriate community in a large and diversley populated country?

If anybody should holiday in China, Iceland, Mexico, anywhere in either North Africa or South America then please don’t forget to view my site. I’d love to get my entire map coloured in and will be forever grateful to my one (To date) visitor from Lebanon, oh and the guy from Russia who painted nearly half my map in one click!

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5,507 would be a decent career tally of runs for a Test batsman. The USA would be proud to total 505 all out. India would take 359 on a difficult pitch and England would love to dismiss Australia for 279. Italy would have liked a little more than 107 in any format and unless it was this ‘new’ T10 stuff then South Africa would be disappointed with 103 all out. My family in France have progressed to 68 (We’ll say without loss!) but Pakistan will be bitterly disappointed to have been rolled over for just 63. Germany scratched their way to 57 whilst Canada totalled 55. To be fair, that’s a lot more than they usually rack-up at major tournaments!

Many thanks to all who have viewed my blog and to cricket enthusiasts in Madagascar, Mongolia and Papua New Guinea… if you’re out there!

World Cup Equality

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You’ll have to forgive me for committing the ultimate sin on a cricket blog but I’m about to ramble on (For quite some time!) about football. This is of course my blog so I can do what I want!

Qualification for the 2018 football World Cup in Russia has well and truly reached the business end. All that remains are the heartbreaking play-off matches to determine which counters join the likes of Panama, Iceland and Iran in Russia next year. I’ll hazard a guess that Iceland will find acclimatising to the Russian climate just a bit easier than Panama. It’s also safe to say that none of the three nations mentioned above will be qualifying for the cricket World Cup anytime soon.

Back to the footy, here’s a breakdown of the percentage of teams from each continental region that will qualify for the football World Cup:

South America: 4 out of 10 teams = 40%

Europe: 13 out of 54 teams = 24%

The Americas: 4 out of 35 teams = 11%

Africa: 5 out of 54 teams = 9%

Asia: 4 out of 46 teams = 9%

Oceania: 1 (And maybe not even that) out of 11 teams = 1%

Disclaimer: Please be aware that the above calculations are based on a couple of assumptions regarding who qualifies via the intercontinental play-offs. Oceania are not guaranteed a World Cup representative and for the record, Australia qualify through the Asian pathway because they got bored of thrashing Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Samoa time and time again.

Referring to the percentages above, the tournament title of World Cup starts to lose some of its credibility. There’s clearly a disproportionate amount of teams that qualify from the historical footballing hotbeds of Europe and South America. That historical bias is of course something that is extremely prevalent on the international cricket stage too.

Back to the three nations mentioned earlier. Iran qualified for the football World Cup as far back as 1978 but for Panama and Iceland, 2018 will be their first time at the tournament. That variety of nations on the big stage and the novelty of seeing virgin World Cup competitors is part of what makes the tournament so special. USA beating England in 1950, North Korea beating Italy in 1966 and Senegal beating France in 2002. Without these results the football World Cup just wouldn’t be what it is. Admittedly there have been a few thrashings as the likes of Saudi Arabia (8-0 against Germany in 2002) and Zaire (9-0 against Yugoslavia in 1974) will attest too.

The 2019 Cricket World Cup is unlikely to see such a variety of international representatives or virgin teams as Russia will next year. There will only be ten teams, yes just ten teams at the ‘World’ Cup. Eight of these teams will have qualified as the highest ranked ODI nations. It’s great that the ODI rankings comprise more nations than just Test teams but no promotion/relegation profile is in existence at the upper echelons of international cricket. Referring to the historical bias detailed in football earlier, little scope is left for a changing of the guard as the years go by. The head honchos eat at the main table with one or two varying visitors from time to time.

I’ll be honest, every time I try to get my head around the meritocracy of lower division international cricket and World Cup qualification, I end up closing the page out of sheer bewilderment. From what I can gather, it’s possible that teams in ICC World Cricket League Division Two can qualify for the 2019 Cricket World Cup but some teams from Division One may not. Don’t quote me on that though! In all likelihood none of them will anyway, such is the convoluted qualification process.

Feel free to put me to shame and figure the whole thing our for yourself…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_Cricket_World_Cup_Qualifier

Teams such as Papua New Guinea and Ireland could be there though the likes of West Indies and possibly Afghanistan will be favoured to qualify for the ten team tournament. Surely a straight forward main tournament of sixteen teams comprised of four groups of four followed by quarter-finals etc would be logical. Yes there have been some horribly one-sided encounters at cricket World Cups, think Namibia at the hands of Australia in 1970 and one or two Canadian performances (36 & 45 all out in 2003 and 1979) but there has also been Zimbabwe beating Australia in 1983, Kenya beating West Indies in 1996 and Ireland beating Pakistan in 2007.

There are so few teams at the Cricket World Cup that a comparison with football for regional disproportionateness is completely irrelevant. In fact to be fair, there isn’t really a geographic disproportion, just a lack of global representatives in general.

Anyway, I guess what I’m getting at is that regardless of sport, a World Cup should be exactly that, a tournament that has a fair and even distribution of teams from across the globe. The football World Cup isn’t perfect but hopefully in the future cricket will allow for the Senegals and North Koreas of the footballing world to have the opportunity at least to produce some shocks that will reverberate around the cricket world.

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Getting Sentimental on New Year’s Eve!

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A few months ago I started writing a blog about cricket. If you’ve found your way here then you probably already know that. The idea was to occasionally write an in-depth article about one or two theories, ideas or proposals I have about the game and to compose the odd book or DVD review.

However I struck upon the idea of International Duck Watch and due to the incompetence of batsmen around the world the said gimmick has kept me rather busy.

In the new year I intend to continue providing my thoughts, crap headlines, nursery school standard drawings and general ramblings about our sport and Shai Hope that any readers out there appreciate my attempt to strike a chord between seriousness and humour (No really, I have attempted to be humorous on this blog!), between being a professional journalist (Which I’m not!) and an amateur blogger (Which I am).

Please accept my double-century of thanks for the time that anybody has taken to even leg glance at my words, particularly the guy from Russia who in one viewing helped me colour in almost half my visitor map!

Wishing all my followers and occasional visitors the very best in 2017, a year in which we can expect the landscape of cricket to continue to evolve with such things as:

Due to unprecedented monsoons in United Arab Emirates, the first ever Test match is played on the Moon. Though the pink ball is easy to see, England’s batsmen still fail to reach 200 in the series as Pakistan’s spinners run riot on the turning pitches!

On Jane McGrath day, Australia’s batsmen all use a pink bat!

Peter Moores is made coach of England… again!

Silly Point himself bludgeons 99 not out from just 20 deliveries in the dizzy heights of division six of his local T20 league!

Boyd Rankin and Ed Joyce make themselves available for England again and are immediately recalled to the side to play against Ireland in the Emerald Isle’s first ever Test match. However the match is a complete washout so Rankin and Joyce return to Irish colours for a winter jaunt to an even newer Test nation… Ibiza!

Peter Moores is sacked as coach of England… again!

Umpires are replaced by robots.

England return to the Moon for a triangular ODI series with Pakistan and Venus and recall 218-year-old spin bowler Shaun Udal in the hope that he can repeat his Indian heroics!