T10 My Way!

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T10 is a format of the game that has recently come to the fore, with even internationals such as Liam Plunkett participating in a T10 league in Sharjah.

T10 is cricket as we know it. It’s half a T20 (No really, it’s that simple!). What’s next? Five5? Anything that might get in the Olympics. Five5Beach, T10 on Ice, Rooftop KwikCricket!

But how about applying some completely different rules to T10? Take the following possibilities for example:

10 overs per side.

Each over is one batsman against one bowler.

The team that wins the toss chooses to bat or bowl first and…

… chooses which batsman or bowler will face the batsman or bowler from the opposition of their choice and in their order of preference.

At amateur level, one player v another per over could be good. At the highest level, maybe bowlers (And batsmen) could have two overs.

There are six deliveries regardless of whether or not the batsman is dismissed. For example: Over one could be Alex Hales against Dale Steyn and the score finishes 9-2. The next over could be Jason Roy against Imran Tahir and finishes 6-3 (Well bowled Imran!) and so England are 15-5 after two overs. They might finish 101-19 after 10 overs. South Africa would have to score 102 of course but how do we provide value to wickets? Are they just irrelevant, simply a dot ball or could it be that South Africa must reach 102 having lost no more than 19 wickets?

This is an idea in the early thought process of its evolution. There’s a few different ways you could go with it. Why not experiment and see what works best?

Extras

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Bye: We provided Hong Kong cricket with a little promotion in a previous addition of Extras…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/01/12/extras-3/

… and now England speed merchant Tymal Mills is heading east to blitz any batsmen that come before him.

http://www.hkcricket.org/en/media/news/kowloon-cantons-add-speed-machine-tymal-mills-to-blitz-squad

Leg Bye: We provided Pakistan cricket with a little promotion (Because it needs it, it’s not like cricket is already big in Pakistan!) in a previous addition of Extras…

https://sillypointcricketsite.wordpress.com/2017/01/29/super-duper-stan/

… and now England ‘speed merchant’ Steven Finn is heading east to blitz any batsmen that come before him.

https://psl-t20.com/steven-finn-replaces-russell-islamabad-united-squad/

No Ball: Liam Livingstone for England anybody?

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… or at least in your Telegraph fantasy team. Watch out for my article in April on who, why and how to pick a successful team!

P.S. Despite LLs 50, we lost the T20I against Zimbabwe in Boston, USA by nine wickets with none of our bowlers able to strike. Our solitary wicket was a run out.

Wide: Duckett delivers!

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It’s back to back wins for England’s Test side after victory in Sharjah. With Haseeb Hameed and Keaton Jennings rested, Ben Duckett made the most (Well, made something) of the opportunity to bat in his recognised position by scoring exactly 50. Duckett put on 47 for the first wicket with debutant Daniel Bell-Drummond, who made 8. Jake Ball recorded match figures of 12-62 as UAE were bowled out for just 61 in their first innings and courtesy of some generous bowling changes, a more respectable 163 in their second. Adil Rashid batted as well as anybody for England in recent times when making 59 batting at six in England’s second innings. Rashid shared a last wicket stand of 48 with a determined Jack Leach before Ball led England to a 175-run victory.

Six to Watch: 2017

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It may only seem like yesterday that the 2016 English domestic campaign reached its dramatic conclusion but it’s never too early to start looking ahead. With only six months until the 2017 season begins, Silly Point has identified six players to watch out for. It’s not just youngsters trying to make their way in the game that Silly Point has taken a look at either. Seasoned veterans receive a going over too with Silly Point predicting some renaissances in 2017.

Jofra Archer, 21, Sussex, All-Rounder

When you Google Barbadian born Archer and this is know joke, he was born on April Fools Day, he appears to be draped in West Indies colours. He wouldn’t be the first Sussex man to have departed Caribbean shores and gone on to play for England however, Chris Jordan anybody! Archer arrived on the English county scene with a bang last season, recording figures of 4-49 on First Class debut against the touring Pakistanis at Hove. Mohammad Hafeez, Shan Masood, Azhar Ali and Misbah-ul-Haq all fell victim to the twenty-one-year-old. Sussex’s six other first innings bowlers managed just a sole wicket between them and it was only Archer who managed to bag second time around when he sent Hafeez back to the pavilion once again. Archer displayed his batting credentials with a knock of 73 against Essex in the County Championship at Colchester, recorded two more four wicket hauls before the season’s completion and took 5-42 against Somerset in a one-day match at Taunton. Sussex will rely heavily on Archer’s contributions in 2017 if they’re to haul themselves up to Division One in both the County Championship and One-Day Cup.

 

Daniel Bell-Drummond, 23, Kent, Right-Handed Opening Batsman

747 County Championship runs at 53.36, 332 One-Day Cup runs at 41.50 (S/R 86.23) and 171 off 139 deliveries for England Lions against Sri Lanka A in a one-day match… yet somehow DBD’s progress in 2016 seemed to go somewhat under the radar, a mid-season injury didn’t help. Last year DBD smacked 127 from just 112 balls against a touring Australian side whose bowling attack included Mitchell Johnson, Peter Siddle and Ryan Harris. You can go as far back as 2013 to find former Kent skipper Rob Key proclaiming that DBD could be a “… 100-test cricketer…”. Despite a more than reasonable 2016, Northamptonshire’s prolific Ben Duckett, Lancashire’s record breaking Roses match teenager Haseeb Hameed and maybe even Durham’s Keaton Jennings have all usurped twenty-three-year-old Bell-Drummond. DBD will hope to press his case for full honours when representing England Lions this winter against the UAE in three one-day games in Dubai and against Afghanistan in a three-day match in Sharjah.

Dom Bess, 19, Somerset, Off-Spin Bowler

Topping the County Championship Division One bowling averages last term with thirteen wickets at 10.46 apiece including two five wicket hauls, 6-28 against Warwickshire and 5-43 against Nottinghamshire, both at Taunton, suggest that Somerset have a real find on their hands in England U-19 international Bess. Of course not all of those that arrive on the scene with a bang live up to the hype, Mathew Sinclair anybody! Some of the mystery of Bess will have evaporated as batsmen have had both the opportunity to face him and to study the videos during the winter. Not that Shane Warne or Muttiah Muralitharan got any easier to play and Bess will remain a mystery to many that have yet to encounter him. The real test for Bess will come when (if?) he finishes with figures of 0-150 and how he responds to doing so.

Look out for my upcoming article ‘England’s Spin Dearth Myth’ for more on Bess.

Jack Burnham, 19, Durham, Right-Handed Middle Order Batsman

Stoneman, gone. Borthwick, gone. Muchall, gone. Mustard gone. No pressure on 19-year-old Jack Burnham then! The 2016 Under-19 World Cup’s leading run scorer registered 630 County Championship Division One runs at 27.39 in 2016 but his limited overs campaigns were rather fruitless. Despite the departures of senior batsmen Burnham will still have the likes of Keaton Jennings and Paul Collingwood alongside him and following Durham’s relegation after an ECB bailout he’ll be playing County Championship cricket in Division Two this term. Durham will be seriously hoping that the teenager can kick on in 2017 and break the 1000 run barrier in the County Championship’s bottom division to help get Durham back into the upper echelons of English cricket.

Nick Compton, 33, Middlesex, Right-Handed Middle Order Batsman

@Compdog’s axing from England first time around was a bitter affair. Second time it was just horrible to watch, to witness English cricket’s Marmite fall apart. There was no bemoaning the selectors this time around. Compton knew he’d had his chance. After commencing the South Africa series with a Comptonesque 85 at Durban, mixed messages from coach Trevor Bayliss resulted in Compton trying to go out all guns blazing to seal victory in the Johannesburg test and ultimately forget how to play the very sort of innings that had earned him international recognition in the first place. It’s questionable whether an experienced cricketer such as Compton should have ever allowed his coaches public comments to affect his game and after returning to the county game he rather alarmingly took a break from cricket altogether. He did however return to the Middlesex ranks and of course finished the season as a title winner. After the fall there were glimpses of his run making ability like his innings of 131 against Durham at Lords in August. With even the man himself surely beyond thinking about international selection, if he can just enjoy himself at the county he felt it necessary to return to then Middlesex will surely reap the benefits.

Mark Footitt, 30, Surrey, Left-Arm Fast Medium Bowler

It would be easy to assume that the proverbial ship has long since sailed for Mark Footitt, at least on the international front. If he wasn’t going to make the England XI in South Africa then maybe it just wasn’t meant to be. He was seen as the County Championship’s marquee signing pre last term but injuries disrupted the left arm seamer’s opportunity to make an immediate impact at Surrey. However as the season progressed and he eventually rid himself of injury he didn’t half come good. The wickets tumbled in the latter stages of the season and Footitt finished the campaign with 34 Division One wickets at 26.85 including career best figures of 7-62 against Lancashire at The Oval followed up by 6-161 against Hampshire at the same ground and 5-90 against Durham at Chester-Le-Street. If he can stay fit he will surely prove a major asset for Surrey and with the international attraction to left arm seamers maybe an England cap could still be within the thirty-year-old’s reach.