Ashes Cricket (PS4): Career Mode – 2023 First Class Round-up


Following our One-Day Plate success, we, Yorkshire, turned our attention back to the First Class format. The knockout stages of the One-Day competition were actually played intertwined with the First Class season. Obviously there was a lot of attention around how I would back-up last year’s introduction to the four-day game given my epic knock of 325 against Sussex.

In the first round of matches against Middlesex, I got up and running with a first innings knock of 40 but that was only a prelude of what was to come. Come the second innings, I shared a partnership of 332 of which my contribution was all of 269. I was actually thinking about overhauling the 325 I had made last year but it wasn’t to be. The most frustrating element to this innings was that it would remain my highest knock of the 2023 campaign.

My reward for another double hundred was to be promoted up the order from five to three which suited me fine. I went on to make 118 and 32 against Glamorgan before enduring a frustrating period with the bat. My next run of scores was as follows: 30 & 32, 0 (1st ball!), 2 & 18 and run out for six before scratchily making 54 in the second innings of that match against Durham. Things improved thereafter as I went on to make at least a fifty in each of the next five matches (And in six out of seven in total). With the fixtures now in reverse, against Durham again, I registered scores of 27 and 67 before really enjoying myself against Kent. As was the case against Middlesex on the opening day, I dominated a lop-sided partnership of 246. I contributed 192 to the combo but went onto make another double century. Rather embarrassingly, I ran myself out with a lazy bit of work when returning for the second having been on 199. I’d reached 200 with the first run but the dismissal kind of took the gloss off any celebrations. With centuries in each innings of the match insight, I was gutted when I failed to execute a shot properly having made 87 in the second innings. I followed those knocks up with scores of 1 and 143 against Mitchell Starc’s Leicestershire.

Despite my List A and First Class contributions, I failed to earn a T20 gig with Yorkshire so returned to the club scene with Leeds. In the only outing that I was required to bat, I only faced the last two balls of the match. I promptly hit the penultimate ball of the game for six to tie the scores then ran two to seal victory. It was great to really give something back to Leeds and not be seen as some big show for whom professional cricket had gone to his head. I still care about my club side and the amateur game in general. It groomed me to be the professional that I’ve become.

Upon my return to Yorkshire and off the back my my recent knocks of 67, 200, 87, 1 and 143 I was promptly demoted in the order to number four in the batting line-up. I wasn’t particularly enthused about that. Following demotion, I fell for just eight against my Northamptonshire nemesis, South African spinner Tabraiz Shamsi. I was his victim again in the second innings but did at least briefly take him to the cleaners before falling for 54. There then followed solid knocks of 50 and 80 against Derbyshire but disappointment at failing to convert them into more hundreds. In the penultimate match of the season against Glamorgan, I batted abysmally and was deservedly mopped up for scores of just 1 and 17. Following that one poor performance, I went full circle, demoted back to number five in the batting order and so finished the campaign where I had started. There was no double ton against Middlesex this time but scores of 64 and 15 took me to a season tally of 1472 runs in First Class cricket. I finished as seventh highest run scorer in the top division though my average of 54.52 was some way down the rankings.

It was a disappointing season in the longest format for Yorkshire. Winning our final two matches restored some pride but we finished in an unacceptable sixth place, way, way off challenging for the title.

As for my career, I now total 2237 First Class runs at an impressive average of 65.79. I’ve reorder six centuries complimented by nine half-tons. Of those six hundreds, three have been doubles and one a triple. I’m very proud of those performances. I also average a healthy 63.73 in List A cricket but am under no illusion regarding the challenge ahead to maintain those figures. I’ve signed up with Yorkshire for both First Class and List A cricket in 2024 but do hope to finally win a professional T20 contract. If I can get some T20 game time with Yorkshire then I can push for gigs in the Irish or Afghan T20 competitions.


Century Seeking Siaka Seriously Stalling!

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No that’s not Papua New Guinea batsman Lega Siaka’s mobile number. It’s his last seven innings in ODI cricket! His contribution to Papua New Guinea’s attempt to reach the 2019 ODI World Cup has been a pretty limp one. His most recent outing against Zimbabwe, caught in the field having accrued just 7 from all of 31 deliveries when batting at three with his team chasing 264, pretty much sums up where he’s at at the moment.

This is an especially frustrating time for the island nation’s great hope, one of the few associate cricket teams to actually field mostly if not entirely indigenous players. Siaka has an ODI ton against Hong Kong early in his career but now averages just 17.47 from 17 innings. Remove his 109 against Hong Kong from the equation and Siaka becomes fiftyless and would average 11.75. I’m always wary of chopping and changing a player’s statistics, it’s a little unfair but put that one extreme career best aside and Siaka has struggled big time. The Port Moresby native actually has three List A tons but an average of only 25.27. Again this highlights the extremes of his scoring pattern. It’s either feast or famine but the feasts are rare, like at Christmas or on your birthday!

Siaka is twentyfive-years-old. He’s not a kid, has represented Melbourne Renegades in the Big Bash and turned out for the Australian Prime Minister’s XI. Of course the problem for associate players such as Siaka is the quality and volume of cricket they’re playing between tournaments. Siaka has represented Essendon in rookie cricket Down Under but compare that to the likes of Netherlands’ Ryan ten Doeschate and Roelof van der Merwe, both of whom are regulars on the English county circuit or Afghanistan’s young skipper Rashid Khan playing in the IPL and Big Bash and the experience aquired just doesn’t compare. It may be that Siaka is more suited to the longer format, he averages 32.69 in First Class cricket but in truth, that’s not the format to prosper in if you’re an associate player. That of course opens a whole can of worms regarding developing Test cricket around the world but I’ve written plenty on that already!

Fingers and toes crossed that if Siaka is presented with another chance in the ICC World Cup Qualifier that he can reach double figures and then clock up at least a second ODI half-century.

Could Gleeson Gleam?


Not making your professional debut until the ripe old age of twenty-seven has a distinctly Australian vibe about it but no, Blackpool born former Cumberland representative and now England Lions wicket-taker Richard Gleeson is English and pushing for what would be an inspiring national selection.

Gleeson averages sub-28 in all three formats (First Class, List A and T20) at domestic level and has claimed ten wickets in four outings for England Lions in West Indies on the current tour.

This on a trip where it’s been the spinners that have done most damage but right-arm-fast-medium bowler Gleeson hasn’t been able to help himself.

As raw as he was in senior cricket in 2016, Gleeson got a gig with Rangpur Riders in the Bangladesh Premier League. There are some who may scoff at the notion of an England call-up for a thirty-year-old with less than sixty professional outings spread across the three formats to his name but it could be that having earned this chance, having waited so long that Gleeson wants it more than some, that in a way he’s younger than his years such will be his enthusiasm and passion to seize an opportunity that he may well have thought would never come. A full England cap for Gleeson would be an inspiring tale to all minor county cricketers out there and indeed to the equivalent in various countries the globe over. The likes of Chris Woakes, Tom Curran and Mark Wood etc won’t make it easy for Gleeson to win a full cap but given the injuries to the likes of Liam Plunkett and with some rotation likely in T20Is at least as England focus on the 2019 ODI World Cup, an England debut for Gleeson might not be as far fetched as some would have thought only a short time ago.

Ashes Cricket (PS4): Career Mode – Plate Princes!


The 2023 season commenced with my introduction to List A cricket in Yorkshire blue. I disappointingly ducked on debut and followed that up with only four in the next match. After starting my First Class career so impressively, I was desperate to show that I could transfer my ability to the professional one-day game. A knock of 72 in my third outing demonstrated that I belonged but in truth I blew a great chance of a century.


I righted that wrong in the next match however but was again gutted to get out. Being dismissed at anytime is frustrating but there’s something really criminal about falling immediately after reaching a milestone. I backed up a maiden List A ton with 68 in my next innings to make it three scores of fifty plus on the bounce.


I then clocked up another ton and this time started to go on. I had made 129 from just 80 deliveries before committing another criminal act by running myself out. Annoyingly, as much as a double ton had been real possibility against Northamptonshire.

My impressive performances at number three in the order saw me promoted to open the batting but my form dipped as a result. I made scores of 23 then 29 in a thrilling run-chase that ended in a tie courtesy of an epic hundred by Gary Ballance. That result qualified us for the knockout stages and a quarter-final encounter against local neighbours Derbyshire. Come the big day however, our expectation exceeding opposition failed to show. Ben Coad claimed four wickets to rip through the underdogs and limit them to a paltry total of just 178 all out. Again, I got started but got out. I really thought that I could carry the team to victory but made only 19. Joe Root (81 not out) however led the way, as we comprehensively paved a path to the semi-finals courtesy of an 8-wicket win.


The play-off for a place in the final would be a tasty clash with our arch rivals Lancashire. On such a big occasion, I was determined to display my qualities and help my county reach the final. I promptly recorded my career best List A effort of 155 from just 84 deliveries. My knock included 16 fours complimented by six maximums. We were delighted to brush aside our trans-Pennine enemy but knew that the job was not done. It would be yet another boundary border opponent come the final in the form of northern neighbours Durham.


On one of the biggest days in the county cricket calendar and in front of a full and hostile house, we won the toss, batted first and totalled just shy of 400. I swashbuckingly contributed to a century opening partnership inside the first ten overs. I reached my fourth One-Day ton from just 45 deliveries but was aghast to be caught on the ring for 102. Joe Root replaced me at the crease and carried the innings with a masterful 138 not out. The lad’s got talent and will go far in the game!


We ran out 2023 One-Day Plate victors by 94 runs. Just look at the smiles on the players faces during the victory celebrations. The pubs and clubs of Leeds and indeed throughout all of Yorkshire made a profit on final night that’s for sure!

I finished my inaugural List A campaign with 701 runs at an average of 63.73 complete with strike-rate of 172.66. I notched 4 tons as well as two fifties and a winner’s medal of course. Next up is a return to the First Class stage where I’ll look to maintain my lofty average of over 100!

Disclaimer: Incase this article seems a little familiar, that’s because I previously mistook the quarter-final for the final. I wondered why there weren’t any celebrations!

Statistical Quirks Discovered Whilst Trawling Cricinfo Player Profile Pages Over the Years


Nathan Hauritz

Australian twirler Nathan Hauritz finished his career with 63 Test wickets and a matching tally in ODIs.

Does anybody have a higher matching pair?

Michael Carberry

Former England opening bat Michael Carberry’s career best batting stats are as follows:

First Class: 300 not out

List A: 150 not out

T20: 100 not out

Neat, very neat!

Paul Harris

South African spinner Paul Harris’ Test career began and ended as follows…

Test debut: South Africa vs. India, Cape Town, January 2nd-6th 2007

Last Test: South Africa vs. India, Cape Town, January 2nd-6th 2011


Napoleon Einstein

Not so much a statistical quirk but his name alone merits a mention.

To be fair, in regards to his statistics, he did score 92 on List A debut but only ever played one more List A match and one T20.

Greg Loveridge

New Zealand leg-spinner Greg Loveridge holds a place in the hearts of many cricket tragics the world over. On Test debut against Zimbabwe in Hamilton, he retired hurt on four not out, didn’t bowl and never played again.

A First Class bowling average of 53.23 didn’t exactly scream “Recall!”.

Mohammad Sami

There are players with worse Test bowling averages than Pakistan’s Mohammad Sami…

But to win 36 caps with a bowling average of 52.74 is mightily impressive!

Disclaimer: There’s probably some far more interesting stats that I’ve previously stumbled upon only to forget about and admittedly there’s some recycled material in here!

A Rash Decision?/Leach Sucking Blood!

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I can’t say that I’m not disappointed. I thought that on the back of good white ball contributions for England and potentially backed up by a good county season, Yorkshire leg-spinner Adil Rashid could push for a Test recall. That now seems highly unlikely given that he’s committed to a white-ball only contract with his county this term. Rashid is only 29 and though he didn’t claim a hatful of County Championship wickets (10 @ 50.00) last term, he’s also played a vital hand with the bat for Yorkshire over the years, batting and batting successfully as high as number six in First Class cricket.

Meanwhile Jack Leach may reap the benefits of not being rushed into the England first team too soon. It seemed as though he wasn’t the selectors preferred choice and has had to remodel his action. He’s just put in a record-breaking shift (8-110) for England Lions in an unofficial Test against West Indies ‘A’. Admittedly Jomel Warrican and Rahkeem Cornwall bagged plenty of wickets too and the Caribbean is the home of many spin bowlers with averages in the teens but ‘The Bloodsucker’s’ figures and current confidence are highly encouraging. Curiously and in contrast to Rashid, the Somerset spinner has, at the age of 26, never played a T20 match and clocked up only fifteen List A appearances. In 52 First Class outings however, he’s totalled 175 wickets at 25.89. For the record, Mason Crane has 77 at… 46.07! Adil Rashid has 490 (Yes 490!) First Class wickets as well as ten centuries.

What Rashid’s decision means for him, Yorkshire, England and cricket in general remains to be seen. If the longer format of the game does survive, it’s looking as though it and T20 might be considered completely different sports entirely. As for the man in the middle, List A and ODIs, you can’t help but fear a slow but certain death!

Tying Batsmen in Knots


Andrew James Tye is 31-years-old and has played only eight First Class matches. He’s not played many more List A matches but is closing in on 100 wickets in the T20 format. He’s been a consistent performer in both the Big Bash and IPL. Oh and he’s now a vital cog in Australia’s limited overs’ sides. If it weren’t for the Big Bash, AJ Tye probably wouldn’t exist.

Tye’s a player I’ve really liked since watching him represent Perth Scorchers in the Big Bash last season. He looks relaxed but not arrogant. When watching the latest T20I, I was surprised at how pessimistic the Australian commentators were about the Perth native’s future. Because of Tye’s penchant for a slower ball, they were insistent that he’ll need to bowl faster in future or risk going the same way as James Faulkner. Tye duly dismissed England’s James Vince with an immaculately executed… slower delivery!

There’s a skill in being able to resist bowling fast and Tye possesses that ability. In his first couple of ODIs against England he went wicketless but was economical. Then he claimed a five-wicket haul before bagging a four-for in a T20I against Tasman rivals New Zealand. Taking pace off the ball and making the batsmen have to generate power themselves puts the onus on them. As well as the bowler getting the batsman out, they might well get themselves out when trying to hit big shots only to find that they don’t actually have the strength to do so.

It seems logical that Tye will be less effective in the longest format and so far the stats back that up. His First Class bowling average is 36.81 compared with mightily impressive figures of just 21.29 and 19.64 in List A and T20 cricket.

It’s par for the course that most bowlers have lower averages in the shorter formats but there’s a hefty gulf in Tye’s figures. The First Class measurement is admittedly a small sample size and of course he may learn, adapt and lower his average. His measured approach should mean he stays fit as permanently semi-injured quicks, the likes of Mitchell Starc, Pat Cummins and Nathan Coulter-Nile are rotated around him.

Tye’s one of those non-superstar but effective players that I like, similar to Grant Elliot and I look forward to seeing how many international wickets he can claim.